Back to Raculator Home Page Instructions to operate the Rackulator Score your antlers with the Press Kit Sample of deer scored Rackulator testimonials Contact Rackulator Order Rackulator and more The"RACKULATOR" is the world's only electronic calculating big game scoring tool.
 

 

Measurements


White-Tailed Deer Instructions

1. lNSIDE SPREAD of Main Beams: 
Measure the inside spread of the main antler beams at the widest place. This measurement should be at a right angle to the longitudinal axis of the skull, and parallel to its horizontal axis.

2. CIRCUMFERENCE of Main Beam: (Fig. 1)  Measure the circumference of each main antler beam at the four places indicated below. Circumferences must be taken at a right angle to the longitudinal axis of the antler at the smallest place between typical tines, disregarding the non-typical tines. 
  C-l. Between the burr and T-1.  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the burr and the typical brow tine, or "eyeguard" (T-1). If T-l is absent, measure at the smallest place between the burr and the second typical tine (T-2), which will make this measurement the same as C-2.
  C-2. Between T-1 and T-2.  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the typical brow tine (T-1) and second typical tine (T-2). If T-l is absent, measure at the smallest place between the burr and T-2, which will make this measurement the same as C-l.
  C-3. Between T-2 and T-3.  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the the second typical tine (T-2) and third typical tine (T-3). If T-3 is absent, measure at the smallest place between the center of the base of T-2 and the beam tip, which will make this measurement the same as C-4.
  C-4. Between T-3 and T-4. 
Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the third typical tine (T-3) and fourth typical tine (T-4). If T-4 is absent, measure halfway between the center of the base of T-3 and the beam tip. If T-1 (typical brow tine) is absent, measure both C-l and C-2 at the same place. This will be at the smallest place between the burr and T-2. If T-4 (fourth typical tine) is absent, measure C-4 halfway  between the center of the base of T-3 and the beam tip.  If an antler has only two points-- T-l and the beam tip, measure C-2, C-3 and C-4 at the same place. This will be halfway between the center of the base of T-l and the beam tip. If an antler has only two points-- T-2 plus the beam tip, measure C-l and C-2 at the same place between the burr and T-2, and measure C-3 and C-4 at the same place, which will be halfway between T-2 and the beam tip. If an antler is a simple spike (no tines at all), measure all four circumferences at the same place. This will be halfway between the base of the burr (not the top of the burr) and the beam tip.

3. LENGTH of Main Beam: (Fig. 2)  First, it is necessary to determine the  main beams and their tips. The main beams are usually easy to identify in white-tailed deer, because they will end at the rear most points; however, some non-typical antlers may have more than one projection at the end of the beam. If so, choose the one that appears to be the logical beam tip because of its contour, size and location. Measure the length of each main antler beam from the bottom edge of the burr (or coronet) to the tip. If a beam tip is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. The measurement follows the center of the antler's outer curve and is essentially parallel to the longitudinal blood grooves. Begin the measurement where the center-line of the outer curve intersects the bottom edge of the burr. This will be on the side of the head and behind the eye, not in front on the forehead.

4. LENGTH OF TYPICAL TINES:  (Fig. 3) 

Even though in this method all tines are measured and included in the score, it still is necessary to identify the typical tines, because the beam circumferences must be measured between
typical tines, disregarding any non-typical tines that may be present. Measure the length of each  valid typical tine on each antler. If a tine is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine must be at least 1 inch long, and no wider than its length. A typical tine is one that grows in the typical location and manner. Be sure not to measure the tip of the main beam as a tine. While the beam tip is always a typical point, it is not a tine, and its length is already included in the length of the main beam. Each typical tine on white-tailed deer antlers has a specific identification number: T-l, T-2, T-3, etc., as illustrated. Record its length on the proper line on the entry form. Any typical tines that are missing are to be identified by a zero. There is no set limit to the number of typical tines that can grow on a white-tailed deer antler (the Rackulator can measure nine) however, it is unlikely to exceed six or seven. To be considered typical, a tine must grow in a typical manner and location, and form the typical pattern for that species. A typical brow tine (T-l), if present, must grow upward from the top of the beam and not from the side or bottom of the beam, or from the burr. The other typical tines must grow upward from the beam in typical fashion, not from the side or bottom of the beam, or from another tine. In white-tailed deer, only one tine (not both) of a double brow tine may be treated as typical (normally the longer one), the other being non-typical. However, both tines of a double tine growing elsewhere on the main beam can be typical in some cases. 


5. LENGTH OF NON-TYPICAL TINES
(Fig. 4) Measure the length of each valid non-typical tine
on each antler. If a tine is broken so that its far
point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine must be at least one
inch long, and no wider than its length. Non-typical tines are those that do not qualify as typical.

 

Mule Deer Instructions 



1. lNSIDE SPREAD
of Main Beams: 
Measure the inside spread of the main antler beams at the widest place. This measurement is to be at a right angle to the longitudinal axis of the skull, and parallel to its horizontal axis.

 

2. CIRCUMFERENCE of Main Beam: (Fig. 1)  Measure the circumference of each main antler beam at the four places indicated below. Circumferences must be taken at a right angle to the longitudinal axis of the antler at the smallest place between typical tines, disregarding the non-typical tines.
 C-l. Between the burr & T-l   Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the burr and the typical brow tine, or "eyeguard" (T-l). If T-l is absent, measure at the smallest place between the burr and second typical tine T-2), which will make this measurement the same as C-2 (Fig. 2).
 C-2. Between T-l and T-2  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the typical brow tine (T-l) and second typical tine (T-2). If T-l is absent, measure at the smallest place between the burr and T-2, which will make this measurement the same as C-1 (Fig. 2).
 C-3. Between the main beam & T-3  Measure the circumference of the second typical tine (T-2) at the smallest place between its juncture with the main beam and the third typical tine (T-3). If T-3is absent, measure halfway between the tip of T-2 & the center of its base where it joins the main beam (Fig. 3).
  C4. Between T-2 and T4  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the second typical tine (T-2) and fourth typical tine (T-4). If T-4 is absent, measure halfway between the beam tip and the center of the base of T-2 where it joins the main beam (Fig. 4).

 

3. LENGTH of Main Beam: (Fig. 5) First, it is necessary to determine the main beams and their tips. The main beams are usually easy to identify in mule deer and black tailed deer, because they will end at the front points; however, some non-typical antlers may have more than one projection at the end of the beam. If so, choose the one that appears to be the logical beam tip from its contour, size and location. Measure the length of each main antler beam from the bottom edge of the burr (or coronet) to the tip. If a beam tip is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off.  The measurement follows the center of the antler's outer curve and is essentially parallel to the longitudinal blood grooves.
Begin the measurement where the center-line of the outer curve intersects the burr. This  will be on the side of the head and behind the eye, not in front on the forehead.



4. LENGTH OF TYPICAL TINES:  (Fig. 6) 
Even though in this method all tines are measured and included in the score, it still is necessary to identify the typical tines, because the circumference measurements must be taken between typical tines, disregarding any non-typical tines that may be present. Measure the length of each valid typical tine on each antler. lf a tine is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine is at least 1 inch long, and no wider than its length. A typical tine is one that grows in the typical location and manner. Be sure not to measure the tip of the main beam as a tine. While the beam tip is always a typical point, it is not a tine, and its length is already included in the length of the main beam. Each of the four typical tines that can occur on a mule deer or black-tailed deer antler has a specific identification number: T-l, T-2, T-3 and T-4, as illustrated. Record the length of each typical tine on the proper line on the entry form. Any typical tines that are missing are to be identified by a zero. Mule deer and black-tailed deer can have a maximum of five typical points on each antler: four typical tines, including one typical brow tine (or "eyeguard 3, plus the beam tip. If the typical brow tine (T-l) is absent (it often is), there can be no more than four typical points (three typical tines plus the beam tip) on that antler. Black-tailed deer often fail to develop the T-3 tine, in which case there can be no more than four typical points on that antler, including T-l (if present) and the beam tip, or three typical points if T-l is absent. To be considered typical, a tine must grow in a typical manner and location, and form the typical pattern for that species. A typical brow tine (T-l), if present, must grow upward from the top of the main beam-not from the side or bottom of the beam, or from the burr. The other typical points (maximum of four) must grow upward in two forks, with T-2 and T-3 forming one fork, and T-4 and the beam tip forming the other. (Both T-2 and T-4 grow from the main beam. T-3 normally grows from T-2; however, sometimes the growth pattern seems reversed, with T-2 appearing to grow from T-3. If so, please disregard it, because T-3 should always be measured as if it grew from T-2.)  In mule deer and black-tailed deer, only one tine (not both) of a double tine can be treated as being non-typical. 



5. LENGTH OF NON-TYPICAL TINES (Fig. 7)  Measure the length of each valid non-typical tine on each antler. If a tine is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine must be at least on inch long, and no wider than its length. Non-typical tines are those that do not qualify as typical.


Elk or Wapiti Instructions

1. lNSIDE SPREAD of Main Beams: 
Measure the inside spread of the main antler beams at the widest place. This measurement should be at a right angle to the longitudinal axis of the skull, and parallel to its horizontal axis.

2. CIRCUMFERENCE of Main Beam: (Fig. 1)  Measure the circumference of each main antler beam at the four places indicated below. Circumferences must be taken at a right angle to the longitudinal axis of the antler at the smallest place between typical tines, disregarding the non-typical tines. 
  C-l. Between T-l and T-2.  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the first typical (or brow) tine (T-l) and the second typical (or bez, or bay) tine (T-2). If T-l is absent, measure at the smallest place between the burr and T-2. If T-2 is absent, measure at the smallest place between T-l and the third typical (or trez, or tray) tine (T- 3), which will make this measurement the same as C-2.
  C-2. Between T-2 and T-3.  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the second typical (or bez, or bay) tine (T-2) and the third typical (or trez, or tray) tine (T-3). If T-2 is absent, measure at the smallest place between the first typical (or brow) tine (T-l) and T-3, which will make this measurement the same as C-l. If T-3 is absent, measure at the smallest place between T-2 and the fourth typical (or royal) tine (T-4), which will make this measurement the same as C-3.
  C-3. Between T-3 and T-4.  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the third typical (or trez, or tray) tine (T-3) and the fourth typical (or royal) tine (T-4). If T-3 is absent, measure at the smallest place between the second typical (or bez, or bay) tine (T-2) and T-4, which will make this measurement the same as C-2. If T-4 is absent, measure at the smallest place between T-3 and the fifth typical tine (T-5), making this measurement the same as C4.
  C-4. Between T-4 and T-5.  Measure the circumference of the main antler beam at the smallest place between the fourth typical (or royal) tine (T-4) and the fifth typical tine (T-5). If T-5 is absent, measure halfway between the center of the base of T-4 and beam tip.  If T-4 is absent, measure at the smallest place between the third typical (or trez, or tray) tine (T-3) and T- 5, making this measurement the same as C-3.

3. LENGTH of Main Beam: (Fig. 2)  First, it is necessary to determine the main beams and their tips. The main beams are usually easy to identify in elk or wapiti, because they will end at the rear most points; however, some non-typical antlers may have more than one projection at the end of the beam. If so, choose the one that appears to be the logical beam tip because of its contour, size and location. If the upper tines are
palmated, as they often are, you should draw
a pencil line across the palmation to show the upper edge of the main beam as it would appear if the palmation had not developed. This will make it easier to locate the center of the antler's outer curve, which thismeasurement should follow. Measure the length of each main antler beam from the bottom edge of the burr (or coronet) to the tip. If a beam tip is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. The measurement follows the center of the antler's outer curve and is essentially parallel to the longitudinal blood grooves. Begin the measurement where the center-line of the outer curve intersects the bottom edge of the burr. This will be on the side of the head and behind the eye, not in front on the forehead.

4. LENGTH OF TYPICAL TINES:
  (Fig. 3) 
Even though in this method all tines are measured and included in the score, it still is necessary to identify the typical tines, because the beam circumferences must be measured between
typical tines, disregarding any non-typical tines that may be present. Measure the length of each valid typical tine on each antler. If a tine is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine is at least 1 inch long, and no wider than its length. A typical tine is one that grows in the typical location and manner for that species. Be sure not to measure the tip of the main beam as a tine. While the beam tip is always a typical point, it is not a tine, and its length is already included in the length of the main beam. Each typical tine on an elk or wapiti antler has a specific identification number: T-l, T-2, T-3, etc., as illustrated. Any typical tines that are missing are to be identified by a zero. In theory, there is no set limit to the number of typical tines on an elk or wapiti antler; however, on a mature bull it is usually five (making it a six point antler, including the beam tip), and is very unlikely to exceed seven (for an eight point antler, including the beam tip). To be considered typical, a tine must grow in the typical manner and location, and form the typical pattern for that species. Typical tines on an elk or wapiti antler grow from the front (T-1 and T-2) and top spaced intervals, in a rather symmetrical pattern. Tines that grow from the side or bottom of the main beam, or that grow from another tine, or from the burr, are always non-typical. Extra tines (usually small) that sometimes occur between T- 1 and T-2, or between T-2 and T-3, are also non-typical even though they may grow from the top of the main beam in an otherwise typical manner sometimes grow adjacent to the royal tine (T-4), are always non-typical.

5. LENGTH OF NON-TYPICAL TINES (Fig. 4)
Measure the length of each valid non-typical tine on each antler. If a tine is broken so that its far point is not on the line of measurement, it should be carded off. A valid tine must be at least one inch long, and no wider than its length. Non-typical tines are those that do not qualify as typical.
 

 
 

Wild Sheep and Pronghorn Antelope Instructions

Note:  The Rackulator always starts on the right side.

To measure the horns of one of these animals, the longest horn is divided into quarters.
This is then used for both sides. To do this, press the STEP button until Extra shows
on the screen.  Roll the wheel, or use the tape to find the longest horn.  Using that figure, press the 2 button twice; this will give you your quarter measurements.  Now mark the base measurement.  Clear the Rackulator.  Measure to the next quarter mark.  Do the same for the next two-quarter measurements.  Clear the Rackulator.  Advance to CIRC-1 by pressing STEP button, and take CIRC-1 measurement.  Press SUB button.  This will enter CIRC-1, and CIRC-2 will appear, repeat until CIRC-3 and CIRC-4 are completed. 


Now press STEP button, Beam will show.  Measure length of horn.  If you are scoring
a sheep, press STEP button until you advance to left side.  Repeat all measurements on
left side and press SCORE.  If you are doing an Antelope, press STEP, Tine-1 will show.
Now take measurement of prong.  Press STEP.  Advance to left side.  Repeat until completed.  Press SCORE.

 
 
 

Home | Instructions | Press Kit | Deer Scored | Testimonials | Order | Become a Dealer | Software | Photo Album  |
Contact |
Links | Sponsorships


 

Rackulator, Inc.
PO Box 248
Golden Valley, ND 58541
Phone: 701-983-4213
Fax:  701-983-4625
Toll free:  888-791-4213